Info

America at War

Explore the rich history of our past through the lens of our military institutions. From the settlement of North America to the present, this podcast not only encompasses traditional military history, it takes an extra step to address the evolution of ideas and institutions. Join us!
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
America at War
2023
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2022
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2021
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: Page 1
Nov 23, 2023

We are moving to the center of the country with this episode. Before the beginning of the Civil War through the decade of the 1870s, the Army was busy in the center of the country. This episode will serve as bridge between the end of the Civil War and the Sioux and Lakota Wars of the 1870s. As settlement stretched west, there were clashes between native peoples and the Army. In a familiar story, dissatisfaction with treaties and the ongoing conquest of native lands, forced the hand of many Tribes, leading to war. The Fetterman fight, and Washita are bellwethers for the future of native peoples being able to coexist with Euro-American settlers. Take a listen!

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Oct 28, 2023

This is our last episode concerning the Nez Perce War of 1877. In the aftermath of Big Hole, the Nez Perce continued east, traveling through the newly established Yellowstone National Park. As it became clear that they were not welcome in Crow Country, the Nez Perce decided to head north to Canada and sanctuary. After exiting Yellowstone, the Nez Perce swung north, clashing with the Army at Canyon Creek. After crossing the Missouri River, they found a site known as Snake Creek or Bear Paw to rest. Nelson Miles took advantage of their pause and besieged them in what would turn out to be the last battle of the war. Cold, hungry, and desperate, they laid down their arms and the war was over. The trauma of 1877 is still felt, but the Nimiipuu are still here. Take a listen.

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Sep 23, 2023

We continue our narrative on the Nez Perce War, concentrating on what happened at Big Hole Montana. After successfully eluding the army in Montana, they camped in the Big Hole valley, thinking they were safe. They were not. Colonel John Gibbon was in pursuit. In what could best described as a massacre in the making, Gibbon attacked the Nez Perce encampment early in the morning of August 9, 1877. As Gibbon's men fired into the tipis, killing women and children, the Nez Perce rallied, pushing Gibbon back. Besieged, Gibbon's command survived, as the Nez Perce bought time for their families to leave the valley. By the end of August, the Nez Perce were at the gates of Yellowstone National Park.

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Aug 30, 2023

We continue the Nez Perce War with this episode. After the various missteps and mistakes by General Howard, the Army struck the Nez Perce again at the Battle of the Clearwater. While it could be seen as a victory, the Nez Perce escaped, leaving their household goods behind. A council among the Nez Perce leaders resulted in a reluctant decision to head east, over the Lolo Trail, to their friends in western Montana. Hoping that they would escape the war, they went east. Howard, belatedly, followed them. The Nez Perce arrived at the foot of the Bitterroot Valley and continued south, ending up at a traditional camping place in the Big Hole Valley. They were happy to have 'escaped' the war, but little did they know, one of the greatest tragedies of the war was about to happen. Stay tuned.

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jul 31, 2023

We are continuing our story of the Nez Perce War of 1877. In this episode, we will concentrate on the start of hostilities. With emotions running high, Joseph and his band left the Wallowa's of northeast Oregon for the now reduced Nez Perce reservation. When they gathered at a place called Tolo Lake, emotions got the better of three young men who murdered some ranchers along the Salmon River. The army responded and the first battle of the war, at Whitebird, began in June of 1877. General Howard, slow to respond, could not catch the bands as they traveled east. In the meantime, in a capricious attack on White Bird's village, it added to Howard's problems. Take a listen!

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jul 17, 2023
With this episode, we continue the story of the Nez Perce War of 1877. With the onset of the colonization of the Pacific Northwest, tensions gradually rose between the Tribes of the Northwest and these newcomers. Once the border between British Canada and the United States was agreed to, the U.S. quickly organized the Pacific Northwest. Isaac Stevens was appointed territorial governor and Indian agent. He met with the Nez Perce in the summer of 1853 to negotiate a Treaty. When anti-treaty factions learned of this, they interceded to make certain all voices were heard. Unfortunately, ten years later, the discovery of gold on the reservation triggered another Treaty which dispossessed many Nez Perce of their lands, creating the conditions for conflict between certain bands of the Nez Perce and the U.S. Army.
 

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

 
Jul 1, 2023

As we move to the Pacific Northwest from California, it is time to consider the Nez Perce War of 1877. The conflict captured the public's imagination, much like the Modoc War, of a Tribe wanting to establish a home, but not allowed. To understand the full measure of the Nez Perce War, this episode and the next will focus on the roots of the Nez Perce culture and homeland as well as the challenges to their sovereignty. Fur traders gave them manufactured goods. Missionaries brought Christianity to the Nez Perce homeland and were harbingers of change.

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jun 9, 2023

Once a year I post a short episode on the state of the podcast. It is an overview of where we are and where we are going. No someone who enjoys history? Tell them about this podcast! We could use some more listeners. 

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

May 31, 2023

In this episode we will be concluding our series on the Modoc War of 1872-73. With the Modoc on the run, they retreated to a stronghold on the toe of a lava field, providing a bastion to protect their families from the U.S. Army. It took time to gather soldiers and supplies and did not attack until January 1873. It failed. In an attempt to break the impasse, negotiations led by General Canby were met with violence, coming to a sudden conclusion with the assassination of the general. A second attack in April 1873 succeeded, but not before the pursuing troops were ambushed by the retreating Modoc. Captain Jack and other leaders were captured in the spring. In a show trial, four Modoc, including their leader Captain Jack, were hanged in October 1877. The Modoc are still here, but the trauma of the event still lives with them. 

Have a question, comment, concern, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

May 10, 2023

This is part two of a three episode arc on the Modoc War of 1872-73. With an increasing number of Euro-Americans settlers coming into the Klamath Basin astride the Oregon/California border after the end of the Civil War, tensions rose. Modoc's feared a loss of access to their homeland and it became an issue with both parties. It put increasing pressure on the Lost River band of the Modoc Tribe to remove themselves to the Klamath Reservation. Governed by two different agreements, one approved by Congress and the other not, created tension. In November 1872 the powder keg exploded when the Lost River band clashed with the U.S. Army. What became known as the Modoc War commenced.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Apr 12, 2023

We are moving into our season on the wars of the western frontier. We are starting on the Pacific coast with the Modoc War of 1872-73, California's only large post Civil War conflict with a native people. This episode sets up the events of the war. The Modoc homeland, in the far reaches of Northern California in the Klamath Basin, was under pressure with waves of immigration that occured in the aftermath of the Civil War. Tensions between settlers and Modoc gradually rose through the 1850s and 1860s that built resentment and pressure for action. Two treaties were negotiated, one in California and the other in Oregon, causing confusion and further tension. With disagreements over who had the right to the land, it would set up the conditions for conflict.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

  

Mar 11, 2023

We are now moving beyond the Civil War and examining the armies role in the western United States. In the decades after the Civil War came to an end, the regular army was sent west. After 1865, with the completion of the transcontinental railroad and the Homestead Act, settlement of the west accelerated. Unfortunately, as the western states began to wholesale colonization, it brought them into conflict with the native peoples who lived in the areas west of the Mississippi River. As this series moves forward, we will handle the various conflicts that were peppered throughout this period from a regional perspective, going west to east. Stay tuned!

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Feb 10, 2023

The period from the end of the Civil War until 1877 was known as Reconstruction. As the name suggests, it was the country's attempt to reconstruct and, perhaps, transform the South. The hope was to not only stitch the country back together again, but provide the freedmen a step up, to integrate the formerly enslaved population back into society. Tensions between Congress and the President led to an uneven and imperfect process. The Army was the only institution that could provide stability, but never had enough men to stamp out the violence and change the attitudes prevalent in the South. By 1877, the north had lost interest and the south put into place a system of control that would not be overturned for a century.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jan 23, 2023

We have reached the penultimate episode of our series on the Civil War. We briefly touch on the surrender of the Confederate field armies but devote most of our time to looking at issues related to the winners and loosers of the war. It is fair to say that Lincoln won the war, but lost the peace. We don't explore all of the issues that led to the defeat of the Confederacy, but we concentrate on the sailient points. Take a listen!

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jan 2, 2023

In this episode, we concentrate on the siege at Petersburg, VA. With Grant unable to destroy the Army of Northern Virginia in the 1864 campaign season, instead he maneuvered Lee's Army into Petersburg for an extended siege. While Lee's army was able to fight another day, as Grant extended the siege lines around Petersburg, Lee's forces were stretched far too thin. In the spring of 1865, Lee was hoping to shorten his lines with an attack on a Union fortification. Unfortunately, it failed and Lee was forced to evacuate the siege lines and attempt to head south and join with Joe Johnston's forces. Short on men and supplies, Lee's gambit failed and he laid down his arms on April 9, 1865. The war was over.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Nov 29, 2022

In our last full episode devoted to the western theater, we know turn our attention to Sherman's next act, his march through the Carolina's. When he completed his march across Georgia, the thought was to reunite with Grant. Instead, Sherman wanted to march through the heart of the Carolina's to the border of Virginia. Imperiling Lee's supply line. Grant agreed to the idea. Sherman marched through the heart of the Confederacy, further wrecking the fragile Confederate economy, and driving morale down to the bottom of the barrel. Despite Jefferson Davis naming Robert E. Lee General-in-chief of the Confederacy, it was too little, too late. The end of the war was in sight. Take a listen!

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Nov 4, 2022

Once Atlanta was secured, Sherman considered next steps. Sherman mulled over an idea - marching through Georgia. After deliberations with the Lincoln Administration and General Grant, Sherman convinced them to back his plan. He wanted retribution and to demonstrate what the Union could do. In a severe blow to Confederate morale, Sherman wrecked the economy of Georgia. Rather than contesting Sherman, Confederate General Hood marched north to Tennessee to distract Grant and the Union high command. Grant and Sherman had planned for this. Hood wrecked the remainder of his army at the battle of Franklin. The heart of the Confederacy was defenseless.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Oct 20, 2022

In this episode we journey east. In the aftermath of the disaster at Cold Harbor, Grant turned his eyes toward Petersburg, the critical supply hub for the rebel capital at Richmond. While giving Lee the slip, Grant's tired troops bungled the capture of Petersburg. A siege ensued. In the meantime, in an effort to siphon troops from the siege line, Jubal Early launched a raid on Washington, DC. While it temporarily succeded in drawing forces off the siege lines, it caught the attention of Grant, who ordered Phil Sheridan to the Shenandoah to stop Confederate intrusions. He did that and more - destroying Early's force and denuding the valley of supplies for the Confederates.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Sep 24, 2022

In our last episode we covered Sherman's march to Atlanta. In this episode we cover the siege and fall of Atlanta. Dissatisfied with General Johnston's penchant for retreat, Confederate President Jefferson Davis replaced him with John B. Hood. Hood was the polar opposite of Johnston - aggressive to the point of recklessness. Upon taking command, Hood tangled with Sherman in attempt to stop his advance on Atlanta. Given Hood's desire to attack, he may have slowed Sherman down, but could not stop him from layng siege to Atlanta. In the end, all Hood accomplished was waste his army away with quesionable attacks. 

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Aug 30, 2022

In this episode we head west and focus on General Sherman's march on Atlanta, Georgia. After the victory at Chattanooga, moving into the Confederate heartland and neutralizing Atlanta seemed a prudent next step. Over the summer of 1864, General Sherman and his opponent, General Johnston maneuvered, retreated, skrimished, and occasionally fought from Tenneesee to Atlanta. Johnston prudently chose to give up space for time to preserve his army, but the Confederates could not afford to do so. Faced with a great deal of criticism, as Sherman's army arrived at the gates of Atlanta, Johnston was replaced with John Hood who, in the later half of the campaign, would destroy the army Johnston wanted to preserve.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jul 31, 2022

In this episode we continue our coverage of Grant's overland campaign. After the wilderness and Spotsylvania Grant continued to move south with Lee moving in concert with him. After being stopped at North Anna, Grant continued south and wandered into the battlefields of McClellan's campaign in 1862. Grant and Lee met again at a place called Cold Harbor. Lee entrenched. Grant attacked. While Grant would recognize that it was a mistake to attack, for Grant's critics, Cold Harbor was synomous with his new nickname, 'butcher Grant'. I weight the evidence and conclude that Grant's failures at Cold Harbor can't be seen in isolation with the other battles of the Overland campaign. Take a listen!

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jul 14, 2022

Grant's overland campaign began in 1864 as he moved south to engage Lee's forces. Grant was determined to destroy Lee's Army. While outnumbered, Lee adroitly moved south in concert with Grant, engaging the Army of the Potomac, first, at a place known as the wilderness, a tangle of undergrowth that was fought over the year before where it was known as Chancellorsville. Grant attacked Lee's forces and nearly suceeded but was pushed back. Disengaging with Lee, Grant moved south and re-engaged Lee at a place called Spotsylvania. Lee had the advantage over Grant, but the Army of the Potomac pushed hard. Grant's determination set him aside from his predecessors.   

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jun 27, 2022

As we mentioned in our last episode, we are ready to start 1864, the last full year of the Civil War. We will focus on Ulysses S. Grant's assumption of command of all armies that the Union could field. After years of searching, President Lincoln finally found a general he could work with. Grant, unlike his presecessors, was not only ready to commit the Army of the Potomac to battle, but pursue Lee until the rebel army was broken. Grant was also ready to apply force at every point of the map to keep the Confederates engaged. While these subsidary campgains failed, Grant was ready to battle Robert E. Lee. 

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jun 9, 2022

 A short episode that will focus on what is next now that we are ready to start focusing on the last full year of the Civil War - 1864.

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Jun 3, 2022

In this episode we finish telling the story of the naval contributions to the Civil War. The story concentrates on the campaigns to close the final Confederate ports open to blockade runners - Charleston, South Carolina, Mobile, Alabama, and Wilmington, North Carolina. The naval forces of both sides made important contributions to their respective war efforts. 

Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next » 7